The White Tears for Afghanistan’s Women

We see the War on Terror in Afghanistan conclude in a similar way to how it began, with plentiful white tears for the plight of Afghan women.
It makes sense, since before missiles are fired or bombs are dropped, war requires a hard sell to the public. We must construct, reinforce, and peddle the narrative to the public. This helps to ensure public opinion is controlled, resistance is problematised, and the parameters of debate are tightly regulated.

Western pledges to improve the conditions of Afghan women were one of the most prominent justifications for the intervention and subsequent military operations to defeat the Taliban. What else could unify, outrage, and indulge the Western white-saviour complex better than Afghan women who needed to be saved from their male counterparts?

The military industrial complex cry to “Save the women!” has the same rhetorical framing as “Support our troops” (or “Support our lads!” for a British parlance), rather than “Support the war”, which is what is really being asked.

Recent Wikileaks reports reveal how the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) constructed a PR “sell” of the war which revolved around saving Afghan women and girls.[1] It literally weaponised liberal feminism to invade, occupy, and make spectacular profits from one of the poorest countries in the world.

The Bush Administration wasted no time in framing the War on Terror as “also a fight for the rights and dignity of women”. Then First Lady Laura Bush openly and swiftly condemned the “severe repression” against women in Afghanistan. The UK Prime Minister’s wife, Cherie Blair, called for moves to “give back a voice” to Afghan women.

In the same breath that the War on Terror was declared, the barbaric treatment of Afghan women under Taliban rule was dramatically thrust into the Western public consciousness. The Western media machine struck narrative gold with the Taliban: these were hostile brown bearded men with turbans and ethnic clothing. They became a dangerous Other as the greatest nation on Earth faced a group who were uncivilised, clumsily handled weapons, failed to speak English, and were hostile to “the freedoms we cherish”.

In 2010, then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton vowed to defend Afghan women’s rights. This was a huge part of liberal feminism – vowing to save the Afghan women, while bombing them. So began “white men saving brown women from brown men” in Afghanistan, as feminist scholar Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak eloquently put it.[2]

Funnily, saving Afghan women and girls played out a lot like making them disappear off the face of the Earth altogether. Over 70,000 civilians were killed and countless injured in the US’s longest-running war, the majority of whom were women and children.[3]

Fast forward to 2021, and we are hearing something not too dissimilar. We have come full circle to see dangerous militarism cloaked in humanitarian and women’s rights language, where the same arguments made by Clinton have been recycled. “Western intervention is something million[s] are praying for right now”, tweeted anti-FGM campaigner Nimco Ali recently.[4] There is apparently now a feminist case for keeping Western troops in Afghanistan.

But why? “The imaginary future bloodshed of the Taliban has so much more potential weight in the coverage than the actual people who have been killed by the US in the last 20 years.”[5]

During these two decades of international intervention, troop-contributing nations paid lip service and cash toward women’s rights, but rarely provided the political capital needed to realise actual gains. Over time, the lip service and cash dwindled too. In 2011, the Washington Post reported on how efforts to support women’s rights were being stripped out of US programs. This article quoted an official who said, “All those pet rocks in our rucksack were taking us down.” US aid funding to Afghanistan fell from 16,748 million dollars in FY 2010 to 3,120 million dollars in FY 2021.[6]

The West’s intervention was framed as an act of benevolence, with many convinced by the characterisation of a liberatory US military combat. Afghan women were used as symbols and pawns in a hugely complex geopolitical context. This civilising mission by the US meant the diverse needs and interests of Afghan women were obscured and obfuscated, and native females were rendered incapable of defining and taking control of their own aspirations.

Kabul is not the entire country
The broad brushstrokes of lazy narratives prevent us from considering important, nuanced realities. Firstly, it is important to note that Kabul does not represent all of Afghanistan. The central government in Kabul never held sway over the majority of rural areas in the country. Furthermore, the much-lauded US-backed female empowerment of Afghan women largely consisted of a handful of the educated urban elite from professional families in the capital.

Instead of economic, social, and political empowerment, Afghan women in rural areas – where an estimated 76 percent of the country’s women live – continued to experience the devastation of bloody and intensifying fighting between government forces and local militias in the last 20 years.

The apparent gains for Afghan women have been distributed in a highly unequal manner, with the increases far greater for women in privileged urban areas. For many rural women, (particularly in Pashtun areas alongside other rural minority ethnic groups), daily life has not changed much from the 1996 Taliban era. This is despite the formal legal empowerment mechanisms currently in place. Since 9/11, and without any prodding from the Taliban, most Afghan women in rural areas are fully covered with the burqa.

The issues central to their lives did not revolve around the Western obsession of whether or how much they cover, but harsh realities much more foundational. The loss of husbands, brothers, and fathers due to the fighting not only generates complex psychological trauma, but also fundamentally jeopardizes their economic survival and ability to function in everyday life. Widows and their children are thus highly vulnerable to an array of debilitating disruptions due to the loss of male family members.

Interviews with Afghan women conducted in the autumn of 2019 and summer of 2020 revealed that peace and stability is an absolute priority for some rural women. This is even if the prospective peace deal is signed on the terms of the Taliban. This fundamental finding was confirmed in a recent International Crisis Group report. While rejecting a 1990s-like lockdown of women which was once imposed by the Taliban, many rural women acknowledge that in that period the Taliban also reduced the sexual predation and wanton robberies that debilitated their lives.[7]

Indeed, for those who commanded U.S. and allied forces in Afghanistan, it was in the mostly rural areas of Afghanistan where the administration of swift and equitable justice meant that the Taliban could compete with the Afghan government. The Taliban could not provide fresh water, electricity, or any civil services, but they could provide near-instantaneous shariah-based justice that sometimes served the best interests of both Afghan women and men by ending disputes and violence.

“Afghan women are incapable of helping themselves”
The post-colonial arrogance of Western attitudes routinely exposes itself. Proponents of this “school” deem it unthinkable that women in Afghanistan would not enthusiastically embrace the construct of liberal feminism and instantly seek to instil it into their own homes and societies. Instead, we witness the dehumanisation of native Afghan women as passive entities which need to be rescued by the West. It refuses to understand that Afghan women are not a monolithic group, and that many of them have long resisted both Taliban rule and Western intervention, opting for advocacy relevant to their cultural and political realities instead.

The irony is that there has been a lot of publicity for women’s rights through promoting a handful of elite women activists in recent years. Yet there has barely been any effort to build trust in communities by encouraging these conservative men to join the platform to support women’s rights. Likewise, proponents of this rights discourse not only fail to ensure that their approach is sensitive to the country’s religious and traditional values, but they ignore the complex cultural diversity of Afghanistan.

“The Ghani government wants to say they’re prioritizing women,” a female Afghan diplomat says, speaking on condition of anonymity during the NATO Summit in Brussels in July. “But they’re really not. Supporting women in Afghanistan is something people all over the world pay lip service to, but money and aid never get to them. It’s eaten by corruption, the monster of war.”[8] Transparency International ranked Afghanistan the fourth most corrupt country in the world, noting that corruption hampers humanitarian aid from reaching its rightful recipients.

As Rafia Zakaria – author, most recently, of Against White Feminism – argues, white feminists in the US decided from the outset that “war and occupation were essential to freeing Afghan women”,[9] no matter what those women themselves thought. Obviously, it requires a distinct level of imperial delusion to think that you can bomb and occupy women into accepting a form of freedom that they do not want to be subjected to. “In terms of current laws including the electoral law, elimination of violence against women law, etc., I disagree with using the Westernized word with it. These laws are purely the efforts of Afghans within civil society who made it happen through lots of lobbying and advocacy.

“The majority of Afghans do not consider women’s education a ‘Western value,’ but see improvements in women’s education as one of the biggest achievements of the past 10 years. Similarly, women’s participation in public life is not a new reality to Afghans. The fight for improved education and democracy is not a recent phenomenon funded by the West; in fact, it’s insulting to Afghans to suggest so. Afghans have struggled for their rights since the early 20th century.”[10]

This is a type of imperial hubris and exact embodiment of a brand of paternalistic and sexist condescension. It is skilfully used by the US to relentlessly lecture the Arab and Muslim world on gender equality and women’s rights. This arrogance rears its head with baffled headlines such as: “Despite the West’s efforts, Afghan youth cling onto ‘traditional ways’”.[11] Unfortunately, their hubris is so strong they are unable to grasp the resistance to the US’s transparently Orientalist civilising mission in Afghanistan.

What empowering Afghan women does not look like
The so-called female empowerment of Afghan women is characterised almost exclusively by dress, with the Western gaze imposing its ideal standards. Photographs of elite Afghan women in miniskirts in Kabul during the 1970s are circulated with a starry-eyed nostalgia of a “golden age” for the country. Western priorities for what Afghan women really need mirror this vision, in a revealing and spectacularly tone-deaf way.

The main interveners in a country shattered by decades of ongoing war seem to be wilfully ignorant that the fatal consequences of conflict – not native misogyny – are the biggest challenges to Afghanistan’s women and girls. Indeed, this applies to their men and boys too.

When asked why two-thirds of girls are still out of school at a NATO summit, then-President Ashraf Ghani largely blamed the numbers on ill-conceived and misguided Western aid efforts, which fail to acknowledge the realities on the ground.

“To get to the very nitty gritty, how many girls schools at the age of puberty have a toilet? That’s fundamental,” he said. “How many girl schools are three kilometres away? The issue here is that international experts were male-centric. They talked about gender, but their pamphlets were glossy and totally lacking content.”[12]

Government statistics from 2014 show that 80 percent of all cases of suicide are committed by women, making Afghanistan one of the few places in the world where such rates are higher among women. Psychologists attribute this anomaly to an endless cycle of domestic violence and poverty. The 2008 Global Rights survey found that nearly 90 percent of Afghan women have experienced domestic abuse.

“Women’s rights were supposed to be the success story of the 2001 invasion,” Naseri said. “But the legacy of war is still killing our women.”[13]

The only conception of female empowerment deemed acceptable was imposed externally through the values of liberal democracy. Any gains made for the progress of Afghan women are all attributed to the altruistic intervention of foreign powers, rather than the struggle and work of native Afghan women working within their own cultural context. That work, of course, also includes resistance to foreign occupation.

Twenty years and almost 3 trillion dollars later, the country is still in turmoil. In October, the U.N. said Afghan civilian deaths were the highest since 2014. From January to September 2018, at least 2,798 civilians were killed, and more than 5,000 others were injured. Gallup’s most recent survey of Afghans, conducted in July, revealed strikingly low levels of optimism: Afghans’ ratings of their own lives are lower than any other country in any previous year.[14]

What the selective outrage glosses over
The same people who feel upset about the fate of women in Afghanistan now would probably benefit from expanding their feelings of rage by considering other pressing issues as well. This includes learning about how the military industrial complex profiteered handsomely from an ongoing war, one that need not be ‘successful’, as long as it kept on going. The beneficiaries of the war made trillions; the biggest winners were not Afghan women but the arms firms, military contractors, mercenary firms, press barons, and politicians who will retire into the defence industries.

When it comes to Afghanistan itself, one must ask: where were the tears for Afghan women and girls when reports of Western war crimes were being suppressed? Reports of British soldiers killing children and proven cases of deaths in custody, beatings, torture, and sexual abuse of Afghan civilians are all extremely alarming incidents which have received little attention (let alone tears) thus far.[15]

Or consider when Australian Elite troops had 400 people witness prisoners, farmers, and civilians be killed, with even more egregious crimes committed, including:

– Junior soldiers were told to get their first kill by shooting prisoners, in a practice known as “blooding”.
– Weapons and other items were planted near Afghan bodies to dress them up as militants and cover up crimes.
– Additional incidents that constitute war crimes and fall under the rubric of “cruel treatment” were committed.[16]
Or how about when America punished the International Criminal Court for authorising an investigation of US forces for war crimes against civilians?[17]

Only when the rage and concern for Afghan civilians remains strong and consistent for all injustices – no matter who the perpetrators are – then the flowing liberal tears for Afghanistan’s people might be worth their salt.

Source: http://www.islam21c.com

Notes:

[1] https://twitter.com/North_Star88/status/1429408799450976263/photo/1

[2] https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/dont-use-girls-as-justification-for-bombing-afghanistan-again/

[3] https://watson.brown.edu/costsofwar/costs/human/civilians/afghan

[4] https://twitter.com/NimkoAli?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

[5] https://theintercept.com/2021/08/19/afghanistan-taliban-defense-industry-media/

[6] https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/08/17/fragility-womens-rights-afghanistan

[7] https://www.crisisgroup.org/asia/south-asia/afghanistan/what-will-peace-talks-bode-afghan-women

[8] https://time.com/5472411/afghanistan-women-justice-war/

[9] https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/8/21/white-women-washing-the-uss-civilising-mission-in-afghanistan

[10] https://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/23/world/asia/afghans-share-their-views-on-the-wests-influence.html

[11] https://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/01/world/asia/despite-wests-efforts-afghan-youths-cling-to-traditional-ways.html?action=click&module=RelatedCoverage&pgtype=Article&region=Footer

[12] https://www.iwmf.org/reporting/were-all-handcuffed-in-this-country-why-afghanistan-is-still-the-worst-place-in-the-world-to-be-a-woman/

[13] https://time.com/5472411/afghanistan-women-justice-war/

[14] https://time.com/5472411/afghanistan-women-justice-war/

[15] https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/11/17/uk-government-and-military-covered-up-war-crimes-report

[16] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-54996581

[17] https://theconversation.com/us-punishes-international-criminal-court-for-investigating-potential-war-crimes-in-afghanistan-143886

FROM: islam21c.com

“ON-LINE MOLVIS AND SO-CALLED ‘TRADITIONAL’ MOLVIS – BIRDS OF A FEATHER

A Student of the Deen in UK writes:
“Currently in the UK there is a concerning and a worrying trend of part time aalim courses springing up in every major town and city. Generally these part time classes are in the evening and those attending such courses do it as a secondary course. Many are qualified professionals etc., or just general people working in the worldly field. They spend the whole day in their worldly pursuits and in the evening when generally people are tired they attend the aalim classes. There are some courses which are completely online and they produce online aalims and some operate on weekends producing weekend ulama. Those attending such courses are perhaps sincere and have a desire to become ulama but they do not want to sacrifice their time and comfort zone which a normal aalim course requires. They are opting for such courses and thereby qualifying as “aalims” and are standing on par with those who qualified in the traditional manner and benefitted from the company of their asaatizah and deeni environment of the darul uloom and had ample time dedicated to studying the precious deen of Allah Ta’ala. This is a concerning matter because these part time aalims hardly have the wisdom, knowledge and understanding of the true Ilm. They do not spend the necessary time required to understand the mizaaj (disposition/temperament) of Deen as they also do not spend enough time in the proper deeni environment. They are also unable to benefit from the much needed company of the asaatizah and Buzurganedeen.
(Today’s buzrgaanedeen are bogus, cranks and destroyers of the Deen. They are mercenaries and slaves of lust – The Majlis)
The amount of part-time aalims graduating every year is much more than those graduating in the traditional darul ulooms set up by our Akabireen and there is therefore a concern that a time may come when these part time aalims would outnumber the true aalimedeen.
(So what! The glut of molvis and sheikhs disgorged by the current daarul ulooms are no different from the online morons – The Majlis)
This would create serious implications for the general deeni environment in the UK in the next 20-25 years and would make it extremely hard for the Ulama-e-Haqq to preach the true message of deen.

(Are there currently Ulama-e-Haqq in UK? The present ‘traditional ulama’ in UK have betrayed Allah Ta’ala, Rasulullah – Sallallahu alayhi wasallam – and the Ummah. They are all bootlickers of the worst kind. – The Majlis)
These new breed of ulama with their modern concepts and methodologies would be running the “show.” (In fact, the ‘traditional ulama’ of this era have introduced modern, kuffaar, shaitaani concepts and are running ‘the show’. – The Majlis)
The masses who always look for leeways would be inclined towards the modernist ideas of these part time ulama. (The socalled ‘traditional’ molvis and sheikhs are experts in the science of shaitaani leeways.- The Majlis)
OUR COMMENT

The fitnah you have referred to is already overwhelming Muslims in the UK. In fact, the same fitnah – the fitnah of Ulama-e-Soo’ is pandemic. It is worse than other plagues. Even the ulama who have graduated from traditional Darul Ulooms, are today the “worst under the canopy of the sky”. This ulama-e-soo’ disease whilst egregiously worst in UK is not restricted to UK. It prevails all over the world. Even our headquarters, Darul Uloom Deoband has fallen from its pedestal. We no longer have confidence in any of our major Madaaris which our illustrious Akaabireen had established. All the Darul Ulooms have become Darul Jahals. They have outlived their utility – the Maqsad for which the Akaabir Ulama had established them. The Maqsad of a Darul Uloom is nothing – should be nothing but the acquisition of the goals of the Aakhirat. But today, these institutions dubbing themselves with the accolade of ‘Daarul Uloom’ have become notorious bootlickers of the western cult of life, hence they grovel to emulate secular institutions. In the pursuit of this most despicable process, one of their salient features has become Kitmaanul Haqq (Concealing the Truth). Another similar disgusting trait acquired by the daarul ulooms of this era is Talbeesul Haqq (Confusing the Haqq with baatil). Then these juhala have the temerity of having fabricated a new ‘principle’ which they call ‘hikmat’ on the basis of which they justify all their ghutha. Warning all such agents of Iblees, the Qur’aan Majeed states: “Do not confuse the Haqq with baatil and do not conceal the Haqq.” These shaitaani attributes acquired by the misguided darul ulooms of today are the causes for the gamut of Zigzag Maajin muftis who have made a mess of the Shariah.
They are no different from the latest breed of online morons who will be parading as ‘muftis’. They all are of the same birds of rotten feather. They are all members of the fraternity of the vilest kind of ulama-e-soo’ witnessed by the Ummah since the inception of Islam. It is these very ‘traditional’ so-called ulama who have closed the Musaajid, suspended Jumuah Salaat and adopted all the kufr protocols of the atheists. It is these ‘traditional’ ulama who are currently engaged in the satanic plot of demolishing Islam, knowingly or unknowingly. Some of the morons do so unknowingly. The chimera could be boodle or other perks offered by the kuffaar government or some ulterior design or even plain moronity. But their common attribute – common with the devil molvis and sheikhs is their satanic silence when the Deen is being trampled on and demolished. All of them are described by Rasulullah (Sallallahu alayhi wasallam) as being ‘dumb devils’.
“He who is silent regarding the Haqq is a dumb shaitaan.”
Besides this, the current ‘traditional’ ulama are following resolutely in the footsteps of the ulama of Bani Israaeel and in the footsteps of shaitaan. On all fronts these ulama are promoting baatil. The ‘traditional’ ulama have corrupted the entire Ulama. The darul ulooms have outlived their utility. True Ulama can now be produced in extremely small numbers in home environments, not online, and hardly in darul ulooms. Online ‘molvis’ are undoubtedly an added dimension of ulama fitnah.
May Allah Ta’ala save the Ummah from this zigzag maajin ‘mufti’ scourge.

FROM THE MAJLIS VOLUME 26 NUMBER 01

A MADRASAH APA’S LAMENT

A MADRASAH APA’S LAMENT
“I have seen in The Majlis your criticism of girls madrasahs. I have recently started at girls madressa and have experienced many ups and downs.
I hated the fact that there was no spirituality at my madressa, everyone spoke about birthdays. Proper Islamic dress code was not enforced, not even by the seniors. The male teachers would talk directly to the females even though from behind a screen. The conversation was not about work. During Ramadhaan there was no time allocated for ibaadat or so on. It really bothered me. I felt as though the little spirituality that I had worked so hard on was dying. Then I also had a friend who had disturbed my peace. As much as we were friends we were just not good for each other. We would engage in idle talk, despite both our efforts to be better Muslims. I then decided to rather leave madressa so that I could attend to my house and my husband and my family. I had hoped that I could continue learning at home, but it was very difficult. I left madressa for about 2 months and after not learning much I started to feel bad, so I decided to return to madressa. It’s been one week since I’m back. I love learning but I still don’t feel content with being at the madressa. It feels like it takes up too much of my time that could be spent doing other things for my home and ultimately for my Aakhirah. Please advise.” (End of the Apa’s lament)
OUR ADVICE

Just get out of the madrasah and stay at home where Allah Ta’ala wants you to be. Life is short. Maut stalks us at every moment. Don’t waste your time at these worldly, deceptive girls madrasahs. Shaitaan has carved out these institutions to divert Muslims from the Deen and to ruin the Haya of Muslim women. The only place for a Muslim woman is her home. You will gain the status of shahaadat by remaining at home occupied in your domestic duties.

FROM THE MAJLIS VOLUME 26 NUMBER 01

WESTERN EDUCATION

Q. A pious shaykh who is a non-Alim, in his bayaan citing Hadhrat Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi (Rahmatullah alayh), spoke in favour of western education. Please listen to the bayaan, and comment on his views. Is his view valid? Jazaakalaah.


Our Comment
We have listened to the six minute bayaan. The Shaykh Sahib is confused. While he mentions Hadhrat Thanvi’s naseehat, he fails to understand that:
1) No one says that secular education is haraam.
2) No one says that science in toto is haraam.
3) No one prohibits employment (nokri).
4) No one prohibits earning wealth.
5) No one says that earning is not necessary.
However, the pursuit of these objects is haraam if undertaken in haraam ways. If the pursuit of lawful worldly objectives entails plunging into haraam, fisq, fujoor and kufr, then such pursuit is haraam. Pursuing worldly objectives via universities and the like leads to the worst of moral and Imaani corruptions. The shaykh Sahib is quiet on all the corruption and evils which are concomitant to the pursuit of western education. He does not even mention what happens to females in universities. The manner in which the shaykh spoke about English ta’leem confirms that he is either ignorant of the evils and destruction to Imaan and Akhlaaq caused by western education or he is intentionally passing over these evils in order to condone such pursuits.

THE MAJLIS VOLUME 26 NUMBER 01

How You Can Help Regulate Your Child’s Access to Smartphones & Social Media

Thousands of testimonies which highlight the prevalence of sexual abuse experienced by young girls have been posted on a website called Everyone’s Invited. The shocking number of testimonies has triggered an Ofsted review, which aims at introducing more protective policies and improving the experiences of females in educational institutions.
The findings of the review were published in a report by Ofsted on 10 June,[1] which immediately shocked many parents, caregivers, and teachers. The revelations shed light on the high levels of sexual abuse and harassment which occur within educational facilities. According to Ofsted’s findings, girls in one school were asked for up to ten nude or semi-nude pictures per night by different boys. The report highlights the alarming problem of inappropriate sexual behaviour among children in schools.

In light of this issue, parents are naturally concerned about how they can protect their child from being abused, as well as preventing them from abusing others.

While the source of the abuse and harassment boils down to the education, upbringing, values, and mentalities of young boys, what also cannot be ignored are the tools which facilitate the exponential growth of these cycles of sexual misconduct. The prevalent use of smartphones and social media platforms by almost every teenager in the present has provided abusers open access into the lives of thousands of children. If this vicious cycle is not stopped, then the impact will be felt for generations to come.

These abuse cases stem from the unfettered access to social media platforms that children in the present have. Surprisingly, almost every child in the present age has unrestricted possession of a smartphone device. If the frequency of abuse cases is to be mitigated, access to smartphone devices must be restricted. Since every child and family is different, we should be open to adapting our approach for every unique situation. Parents with younger children are in a better position to tackle this situation more efficiently. But even for the parents of older children, imposing clear rules and boundaries may be the only way to prevent episodes of abuse from occurring on social media platforms.

In this article, I will outline the advice I often give to parents regarding the use of smartphones and social media.

1. Do not give your child a smartphone

Refusing to give your child a smartphone is not due to a lack of trust, but about giving them the right things at the right age. If a parent were to give their child a bottle of alcohol and permit them to play with it, do you think the child would not end up opening the bottle and drinking from it? Would we be surprised if the child ultimately ended up becoming addicted to the substance? Similarly, a smartphone can be a dangerous tool if placed in the wrong hands. If such devices are used improperly, a person can face numerous complications related to mental health, such as severe anxiety or depression.

Inform your child that they can have a smartphone when they turn 16, that is, once they start college or their senior years in secondary school. In the years before they turn 16, ensure that you educate your child regarding the benefits and harms of smartphones and social media. Educate them about the values of right and wrong, so that the process of learning and understanding becomes easier for them. You must also consider the fact that a child learns from what they see. Therefore, you must be a positive model by exhibiting the best behaviour with your smartphone and social media usage. If you are using these applications to the extent that they are taking over your life, your child will not value your advice and rules.

Owing to your strict guidelines, your child may feel like an outcast by being the only primary student who does not have a smartphone. In response to such concerns, you should educate your child by informing them that it is perfectly fine to uphold different values and standards. Inspire them by saying that we should be leaders, not blind followers of others. Remind them that during the technological age, it is extremely dangerous to obey others without thinking about the values of right and wrong.

2. If a phone is required, then consider giving a technologically inferior model

If you need to give your child a phone due to health and safety reasons, such as their school being located far away from their area of residence, then give them a technologically inferior device. By such a phrase I am referring to older phone models which do not have any smartphone capabilities.

This will enable your child to contact you in case of an emergency, yet they will not be able to have access to any smartphone features.

3. If a smartphone is required, then do not give it to ages under 11

If for whatever reason you feel that your child requires a smartphone, then do not give it to a child of primary school age. Only provide the smartphone when they are 11 years of age or older. The phone should not be under contract, and have no data plan. This way your child will only be able to access the Internet or mobile applications when they are in Wi-Fi zones. In addition to these measures, instruction about the appropriate use of smartphones is still necessary, and ideally, your child should not have any social media applications installed. Bear in mind that most social media applications are designated for the ages of 13 and older. You should also ensure that your child submits their phone to you whenever they arrive home, enabling you to maintain control of their device.

4. Regulate their time

If you wish to give your child some time to use their phone at home, it must be regulated. For example, they could be permitted one hour of phone usage straight after dinner. However, the use of the phone must be in communal areas to ensure nothing inappropriate is occurring. Under no circumstances should any technological devices enter the bedroom. After they have indulged themselves with the smartphone, they should hand the device over to you. It is also important that as a child’s first teacher, you must also appropriately manage your device usage. For instance, if your child is not using their phone at home, then you as a parent should also model that behaviour and try to avoid phone usage during after school hours. Instead, use it in the evening after your child has gone to bed, if possible.

5. Use limits and preventive measures

If you have agreed to let your child use some social media applications, then a few limits and preventative measures must be put in place. These include the following:

  1. Add a parent or guardian as a contact,
  2. Only add friends and family members approved by parents,
  3. Do not add acquaintances of the opposite gender,
  4. Do not allow your child to set their profile page as private.

This is still not the best option, but at least there will be some rules and regulations in place. These measures will mitigate the potential harm that your child may encounter during their use of social media.

6. No phone at night

Under no circumstances should you allow your child to have their phone with them during the night. It must be taken from them before bed, as this is a time of greater risk. In fact, studies confirm that most cases of harassment and cyberbullying take place at night, and most girls are asked for nude or semi-nude photographs during overnight hours. No child should ever be allowed to take a smartphone with them to bed. It is therefore essential that the bedroom remains a technology-free zone, and it is your duty as a parent to maintain checks and balances on your child’s night time activities.

7. Put parental controls on your Wi-Fi

Unfettered access to the internet contributes to the abuse and harassment of children. To combat this, there are a number of services that parents can utilize to help put filters on their home Internet network. Through these simple measures you can protect your child from accessing harmful content and other potential risk areas.

While we may face pressure from our children on these matters, we must nevertheless be mindful that as parents we assume the obligation of protecting our children and raising them up with good values. Smartphone devices and social media platforms are not age appropriate forums for children, even if the current degree of restrictions worldwide is limited. Besides the requirement of them having to reach mature age, you must provide your child with sufficient know-how regarding the advantages and liabilities found in modern technology. When a child realises that your rules come from a coherent value system which is designed to make them a better person, they will be more inclined to abide by your commands. This way, as parents we will face a lower degree of friction and ensure to safeguard our future generations.

I have been working with Parents, Carers and Schools to help cover difficult sensitive topics, with a view of helping to improve safeguarding.

Last year I published the second book part of the ‘Difficult Conversation Series’ and addresses several safeguarding topics.

‘Let’s chat about your body & privacy’ uses relatable scenarios and discusses issues around body safety, exposure to indecent images (pornography), and sharing of images via social media (sexting).

There are several thinking points in the book which encourage discussion and problem-solving. This book helps children, parents, and teachers to explore difficult situations and conversations in a child-friendly and sensitive way.

The book is designed for pre-teens and early teens (marked as suitable for children aged 10+) and helps prepare children for Secondary School and the teenage years.

The book is available to purchase on Amazon here

Source: www.islam21c.com

Notes:

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-sexual-abuse-in-schools-and-colleges/review-of-sexual-abuse-in-schools-and-colleges#what-did-we-find-out-about-the-scale-and-nature-of-sexual-abuse-in-schools

MENTAL COLONIZATION

The era of colonialism has not ended. It has only moved into another sphere. While political colonialism has seemingly ended, the aims of colonialism—the aims for which the western countries had colonized the African and Asian 1ands—are very much alive. The same aim which had motivated political colonialism is today the motive of all western conspiracies, in particular American conspiracy.


THE AIM
The African, Arabian and Asian countries were colonized by the western powers to enable them to siphon off the wealth of these lands. The colonial masters were ‘far-sighted. They had realized that the day will come when they will be compelled to relinquish the colonies and hand them over to the local inhabitants. They, therefore, set in motion their well -prepared plot to retain their hold over these territories.


THE PLOT
The pivotal base of the plot was the colonization of the minds and hearts of the slaves whom the colonialists had subjugated. The minds of the Arabs, Africans and Asians had to be transformed or westernized so that while the new rulers would be from the local population, the intelligentsia in control of the affairs of the land would be mental slaves of the colonial masters of the West who will pull the strings. The colonialists have undoubtedly achieved a great success in the implementation of their plot. Today all the countries of the so-called third world—Muslim and non-Muslim—are ruled by westernized minds governing on behalf of America, Britain and France.


THE MUSLIM WORLD

The initial stage of the plot to colonize the minds and the hearts of Muslims was to disrupt and dismantle the Islamic system of education (Ta ’leem and Tarbiyat) which the Ummah had inherited from the Salf-e-Saaliheen. The first move for achieving this end was the repression and elimination of the Ulama who always were the Defenders of the Deen. Thousands of ‘Ulama, especially in India (now India, Pakistan and Bangladesh), were massacred. The Madaaris were closed down and the Auqaaf properties confiscated. The growing generations of the Ummah were held in ignorance of their Deen. Then came the final installment in the plot. Western education was thrust onto the populace. The cream of Muslim youth had their minds subverted with kufr and immorality. They were exported to western universities in England and thoroughly groomed and schooled in kufr. Thus came into being a new breed of ‘muslims’ with minds colonized. This breed of pseudo-Muslims returned to rule their lands on behalf of their colonial masters.


THE NEW BREED

This new breed of hybrid ‘muslims’ returned with a hatred for Islam—a hatred for the Sunnah of Rasulullah (sallallahu alayhi wasallam). But they were schooled in western diplomacy which made them adept in the exercise of concealing their kufr and presenting a false facade of nafsaani ‘Islam’ which was appealing the ignorant masses of slaves living in the Muslim lands It was this new breed of kuffaar—westernized Arabs and Asians—born in Muslim homes and educated by kuffaar in kuffaar universities masquerading as Muslims under the subterfuge of Islamic names, who dismantled the Khilaafat and introduced the kaafir system known as democracy. It is by the medium of this system of government that the westernized ‘muslims’—the puppets and slaves of the West—entrenched themselves in the seat of government. The West had thoroughly prepared the stage for their protégés to perpetuate their colonial stranglehold on the lands of the Ummah. We therefore see today that all the countries of Islam barring Afghanistan, are thoroughly under western yoke. They are still ruled by the colonialists who have put up their democratic fronts to impose their kufr and immorality on the ignorant Muslim masses. The corruption of the western protégés—those in government in Muslim lands—suits the plan and plot of the western kuffaar. The policies for government are formulated by the West, sometimes directly by America, Britain or France, and mostly through their agents—United Nations, the World Bank and other similar agencies which are all the creations of the western kuffaar.


TASHABBUH

Tashabbuh bil kuffaar (Emulating the kuffaar) is the product of colonized minds and hearts. Everything of the kuffaar appear appealing and progressive while the sunnah of Rasulullah (sallallahu alayhi wasallam) is detestable and retrogressive. It has therefore become convenient and expedient for the pseudo Muslims to attribute the Sunnah to the Ulama so as to find plausible grounds for refuting and rejecting it. The masses are misled into believing that the Shariah is the creation of the Ulama while in reality it is the Qur’aan and the Sunnah. But colonized minds and hearts have made people the slaves of the nafs and the slaves of their colonial masters. This disease is deeply embedded in the hearts of Muslims. It is for this reason that they are still under the yoke of colonialism, albeit in different spheres—mental, social and economical. About these westernized puppets parading as Muslims and milking the lands of Islam on behalf of their colonial masters, the Qur’aan Majeed says: “Those who do not govern according to that which Allah has revealed (i.e. His Shariah), verily, they are the kaafiroon.” This is the situation prevailing in all Muslim lands today—all governments besides the government of the Talibaan, are kufr governments.

JALSAHS, GIRLS MADRASAHS AND PICTOGRAPHY – TAQI SAHIB’S BELATED LAMENTS

On this topic, a Brother from the UK writes:

“I refer to recent Majlis article on Taqi Usmani’s condemnation of Khatme Bukhari programmes after he, himself, having been amongst its biggest proponents for many years.

I was reminded of a Malfooz of Taqi in which he laments in a similar manner regarding the mushrooming of girl’s madrasahs. Whilst lamenting, he is reminded by someone that his own institution had a girls madrasah, to which he responded, in justification, that this was the very first one!

The short-sightedness of this justification would have been comical if the consequences and repercussions of the mushrooming of these unnatural institutes, for which he himself is the flagship pioneer, weren’t so tragic.

There are similar laments of Taqi in respect to misuse of digital photography and “Islamic” banking.

He seems blissfully unaware of the fact that his own reckless and Haraam fatwas and actions have been amongst the biggest impetuses to opening for the masses the floodgates of satanism in all these areas which today he is lamenting.

Perhaps, after his recent stunt of conducting a lengthy television interview with a young female, face to face without purdah, he will one day begin lamenting on every other molvi embarking on similarly shameless shenanigans in open public.

And, of course, the laments in the eternal abode will be irredeemable and infinitely greater. May Allah Ta‘ala protect us.

The malfooz on girls madrasahs is below. I have bolded his admission of guilt.”

(End of the Brother’s letter)

Taqi Sahib’s lament

Lamenting on the mushrooming of girls madrasahs and the production of ‘jaahilahs’, Taqi Sahib, addressing an administrator of a girls madrassah, said:

‘The number of madrassa (traditional Islamic teaching institution) for girls is now exceeding that for boys (in Pakistan). I fail to understand the emphasis been given to this phenomenon.

Are there any precedents for this from our earlier pious predecessors, the Blessed Companions, the Ta’baeen, the one who came after them or even our elders of Deoband? I fear these institutions, especially those with residential hostels for possible inappropriate mishaps.”

The administrator mentioned that even Taqi Sahibs Darul Uloom in Karachi has a girls madrasah. In response, Taqi Sahib said:

Moreover, we try our best that all teaching is via female instructors.’ (This is a silly, flapdoodle response of Taqi Sahib, in a baseless endeavour to cover up for the error of the girls madrasah which he had initiated at his madrasah. – The Majlis)

Another scholar commented that the duration of the course for females has now been extended to 8 years. Taqi Sahib said:

‘It is 6 years for the expedited track. I agree with this. Previously the 4 years course was severely deficient. The graduates were deemed aalimah (scholars) whereas in fact they remained jaahilah (grossly ignorant). “

Office, Darul Uloom Karachi, 21 Ramadan 1437/ 27 June 2017 post Zuhar

(End of Taqi Sahib’s statement)

Our Comment

Taqi Sahib’s belated admission of the gross error of girls madrasahs and jalsahs such as Bukhaari Jalsah, comes at a time when the Imaan and Akhlaaq of a great segment of the Ummah have been ruined and laid to waste. His corrupt fatwas and extreme short-sightedness have caused irreparable damage to the Ummah. The wabaal (calamity) of his convoluted fatwas has settled on him as well. Due to lack of far-sightedness which is the attribute of fiqaahat which Taqi Sahib obviously lacks, he is responsible for misleading countless of thousands of the Ummah. Furthermore, his convoluted fatwas have provided ammunition to miserable paper molvis to denounce and reject the Haqq of the Shariah which the Ulama-e-Haqq have always proclaimed.

We have been highlighting the evil of these unnatural girls madrasahs for decades as well as the evil of jalsahs. Hadhrat Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi (Rahmatullah alayh) has also condemned these institutions and haraam activities. But all the naseehat fell on deaf ears.

“Allah casts rijs (filth) on the brains of those who have no aql (brains).”

10 Sha’baan 1442 – 24 March 2021

Please advise on the permissibility of engaging a non Muslim teacher to teach our children at home.

Q. Please advise on the permissibility of engaging a nonMuslim teacher to teach our children at home.

A. It is not permissible to have a non-Muslim to teach your children even at home. The kufr and spiritual rijs and najaasat of his/ her kufr will have a detrimental athar (effect) on the children. Rasulullah (Sallallahu alayhi wasallam) forbade breastfeeding by even a Muslim woman if she is ignorant. He said that her ignorance will be transferred to the baby via her milk. To a greater extent will kufr, rijs and najaasat of the non-Muslim be contagious.

The final ‘report’ – will it be the right… or the left?

The life of this world is an ‘exam room’, the two ‘papers’ to be ‘written’ are that of Īmān (Belief) and Ā’mal (good deeds)… but the results will only be announced in the next world! The ‘paper’ of Īmān has to be passed… with 100% marks! The ‘paper’ of Ā’māl is to strive and ‘stock up’ on good deeds for the Day of Judgment. Even the little deeds will count in the Court of Allāh Ta’ala, therefore Nabī-Karīm ﷺ mentioned not to regard any good deed as small, and seek salvation from hell, even if it is through giving one piece of a date in charity.

The one given the ‘report’ in the right hand – a sign of success – will call out in excitement, ‘Look at my results!’ He will talk about how he strove in this world and will be entered into paradise to enjoy the bounties of Jannah, which is beyond imagination! The one who receives the ‘report’ in the left hand – a sign of failure – (Allāh save us!) will be in misery and disgrace, and wish for death to overtake him. But, the life after death is everlasting and neverending, either in bounties and favours of Allāh, or punishment in the grave, disgrace on the Day of Judgment and suffering in hellfire.

In the Holy Qur’ān, Allāh Ta’ala teaches us a Duʿā to be saved from disgrace on the Day of Judgment: ‎وَلَا تُخْزِنِي يَوْمَ يُبْعَثُونَ And do not disgrace me on the Day when all will be resurrected – [26:87]

Alas, life is passing like a fast flowing river and before we know, time is up. Despite our busy schedules, sparing a little time for Duʿā after the 5 Ṣalāh will take us a long way in this world and the Ākhirah.

Summary: Jumu’ah Talk – Umhlanga on April 26, 2019